The amount of heat felt because it’s a real place-Tokyo Game Show 2022 on the mainstream day Japan Top News

General public entrance


General public entrance to the “TOKYO GAME SHOW 2022” (18th).

The large-scale gaming event “Tokyo Game Show 2022” (TGS2022), which started on September 15, will end on September 18. Makuhari Messe, which was the actual venue, was open to the public on September 17 and 18 and was packed people.

In 2020, it will be held online due to the spread of novel coronavirus infection. In 2021, a real place has also been set up, mainly online, but limited to the press and influencers. In 2022, a real place has been set up to welcome the general public for the first time in three years. At TGS2022, it was open to the public from 2:00 p.m. on the 16th, the second working day, but more visitors were welcomed during the open day.

As previously reported, the total number of visitors to the actual site (four days including working days) was announced at 138,192. Regarding the public open days, before the impact of the new corona, there had about 100,000 visitors a day, but this time it was about half the number of visitors, about 40,000.

This time, due to the limit of the number of people in the hall, the upper limit of the number of tickets issued for each event was decided and sold. For general visitors, there was only online pre-sale of various game guides, and there was no same-day ticket sales. Also, children under primary school age were not allowed in even if accompanied by a guardian, so there was no corner for families like the ” Family Game Park” that existed until now. At the same time, it was clearly stated that no cosplay space or cosplay dressing room would be set up in the venue, and cosplay photo shoots in and around the venue would be prohibited.

The author only visited on the 18th, the last day, when it was open to the public. The size of the room was about 70% of what it was before, but even during lunchtime when there were a lot of visitors in the room, there were certainly many places where people gathered here and there. However, I didn’t feel any extreme congestion like I was stuck in transit. From someone who knew the aisles used to be full of people and hard to get around, it felt like there was plenty of room.

Even so, there has been a flood of requests to try out new games provided by each company. Although the response differed between companies, there were kiosks that finished giving out numbered tickets earlier, restrictions on queuing and wait times of around 2 hours. In addition to major game makers, the independent game area was also crowded all the time.

Virtual reality is also thriving. On the Capcom stand, which was an opportunity to try out the PlayStation VR2, the distribution of numbered tickets ended early. Meta’s “Meta Quest 2”, which exhibited its own booth for the first time, has already passed the release of the device, but there has been a waiting time of more than 200 minutes for the trial. The stand of Pico, a Chinese virtual reality manufacturer, was also visited by many people who wanted to experience it.

Although there were no event stages set up by the organizers and many major game manufacturers did not set up stages in their booths, some of the booths held events featuring celebrities, influencers, pro gamers and virtual talent. was also seen.

I’ve been covering the Tokyo Game Show for a long time, including the days it was open to the public, but this is the first large-scale event in three years and amid the need for novel coronavirus countermeasures. Due to restrictions on the number of visitors, the number of visitors was lower than before the corona disaster, but my frank impression is that there were more visitors than I had imagined. And although there are things that have changed and things that have not changed, when you see the scenes where you can feel the visitors’ enthusiasm, the serious expressions in the game, and the fun of the photo spots, you can say, “This is the scene.” I wanted to see her.” I thought that would motivate me as an interviewer.

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